Summer Work: Task 2

Task 2
Over the summer break you need to visit and review 2 cultural arts events. This
can be an exhibition, a play, review a book, a performance or any other event –
which is of cultural interest.
As well as reflecting on your experience of the event, your review should be
informed by reading other peoples reviews of the same event and should not be
purely descriptive. When you are choosing what reviews to look at/reference
find something written in the formal press and something written more
informally for a blog. Think about the use of language in each and what each
approach can offer the reader.
You will need to give a 5-7 minute presentation of your reviews to the rest of the
group next term.

Japanese Prints – (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

June 12th 2013 – October 6 2013

On Thursday 20th June, I visited the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid. I spent about two hours in here looking at so much work.  I saw a lot of religious paintings and admittedly, I didn’t know much about them, however, they were still very interesting. I also admired the different sculptures and statues I saw. The detail was fantastic. One show that I took most interest to, was a temporary exhibition of Japanese Paintings.

This exhibition wasn’t huge and it wasn’t crowded with works either. There were over 50 prints in this show. In just one room, the prints were displayed round in chronological order. Each piece of work was so delicate to look at. The oldest print, ‘Daifukucho sankai Nagoya’ by Torii Kiyonobu was created in the late 17th century. The second oldest belonging to Isiwaka Toyonobu titles ‘Fisherwoman catching Ormers and a Boy’ in 1760. These being the oldest prints were created from two blocks in two colours, with the rest of the exhibition printed using multiple blocks in colour. Other works in the exhbition included some by, Katsukawa Shunsho, Kubo Shunman and Katsukawa Hokusai. The majority of works in this exhibition were purchased by the Japanese Ambassador of Madrid in 1936. Recently, the collection has increased with works being bought from the Madrazo Collection in 2000 and then a donation made by collector Antonio Correa in 2007.

I spent quite a while looking at each print. They were so simple yet which so much detail. Each print was similar but different in many ways. I noticed each print were of similar colours and tones. Some were part of a series and told a slight story, yet others were just individual prints which usually included more than one person in.

Things I enjoyed about this exhibition:

With this exhibition, I really liked how the works were spread out so you could take time taking each print into account with no distractions. Also how they were displayed in order so you were able to see how japanese printing evolved.

Things I didn’t enjoy about this exhibition:

How small the prints were. With Japanese printing, these were printed quite small which was such a shame as some of the works there would have looked even better if they were printed bigger!

Find below a list of the works in this exhibition:

1. Daifukucho (The actors Ichikawa Danjûrô I as Fuwa Banzaemon, Yamanaka Heikuro I as Dazainojo and Sodeoka Masanosuke as Fujigae performing the playDaifukucho Sankai Nagoya at the Nakamura theatre in Edo)
Attributed to Torii Kiyonobu
Woodblock print, sumizuri-e [a single woodblock printed in black ink], 172 x 240 mm
1697
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
2. Woman Gathering Ear Shells and Boy
Ishikawa Toyonobu [Ishikawa Shuuha hitsu]
Woodblock print,benizuri [two woodblocks each printed in a different coloured inks], 270 x 135 mm
c. 1760
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
3. Chi: Musashi PlainPair of Hidden Lovers. From the series‘Tales of Ise’ in Fashionable Brocade Prints (Fûryû nishiki-e Ise monogatari)
Katsukawa Shunshô (Shunshô ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e [several woodblocks each printed in a different ink], 220 x 155 mm
c. 1770 – 1773
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
4. Children of Street Vendors (Tsutsu-izutsu). From the series‘Tales of Ise’ in Fashionable Brocade Prints (Fûryû nishiki-e Ise monogatari)
Katsukawa Shunshô (Shunshô ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 290 x 135 mm
c. 1775 – 1785
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
5. Dance. From the series Niwaka Festival in the Green Houses (Seirô Niwaka)
Kitagawa Utamaro (Utamaro hitsu)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 325 x 145 mm
c. 1801
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
6. Courtesan
Kikugawa Eizan (Kikugawa Eizan hitsu)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 710 x 235 mm
c. 1820 – 1830
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
7. Courtesan
Utagawa Toyokuni (Toyokuni ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 390 x 265 mm
c. 1810 – 1820
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
8. Scene of the Middle Class (Chûbon no zu). From the series Three Ranks of Young Women According to their Fashions (Fûzoku sandan musume)
Kitagawa Utamaro (Utamaro hitsu)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 370 x 255 mm
c. 1794 – 1795
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
9. Two Young Women with Fan
Kitagawa Utamaro (Utamaro hitsu)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 325 x 220 mm
c. 1790 – 1800
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
10. The Actor Nakamura Utaemon in the Role of Kudô Suketsune
Gosôtei Hirosada (Hirosada)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 255 x 195 mm
1851
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
11. Country Scene. From the seriesColours of Spring (Haru no iro)
Kubo Shunman (Shôsadô Kubo Shunman ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 245 x 237 mm
1794
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
12. Kameido Temple (Kameido tenjin). From the seriesFamous Places in the Eastern Capital (Tôto meisho ichiran)
Katsushika Hokusai
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 205 x 297 mm
1800
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
13. The Benten Shrine at Shinobazu Pond in Ueno(Shinobazu no ike Benten hokora). From the seriesFamous Places in Edo (Kôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 370 mm
c. 1830 – 1844
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
14. Shinagawa Bay from Kasumigaseki (Kasumigaseki). From the series Famous Places in Edo (Kôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 370 mm
c. 1830 – 1844
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
15. Cherry-Blossom Viewing at Asuka Hill (Asukayama hanami). From the series Famous Places in Edo (Kôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 370 mm
c. 1830 – 1844
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
16. Inside Zôjô-ji Temple in Shiba (Shiba Zôjôji sannai no zu). From the series Famous Places in the Eastern Capital(Tôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 370 mm
c. 1832 – 1834
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
17. Kanda Myôjin Shrine (Kanda Myôjin). From the seriesFamous Places in the Eastern Capital (Tôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 370 mm
c. 1832 – 1838
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
18. Precincts of the Shiba Shinmei Shrine (Shiba Shinmei Keidai). From the series Famous Places in the Eastern Capital (Tôto meisho)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 250 x 375 mm
c. 1832 – 1838
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
19. Station 33: Shirasuka, View from Shiomizaka(Shirasuka Shiomizaka zu). From the series Fifty-three Stations of the Tôkaidô Road (Tôkaidô gojusan tsugi)
Utagawa Hiroshige (Hiroshige ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 255 x 350 mm
c. 1833 – 1834
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
20. Kabuki Theatre Scene with the Actors Iwa Hanshirô and Ichikawa Ebizô
Utagawa Kuniyoshi (Ichiyûsai Kuniyoshi ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 350 x 495 mm (diptych)
c. 1840
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
21. The Warrior Chinzen Hachiō Tametono
Katsukawa Shuntei (Shuntei ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 365 x 500 mm (diptych)
1811 – 1814
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
22. Fireworks over the Ryôgoku Bridge (Ryôgoku hanabi no zu)
Utagawa Kuniyasu (Kuniyasu ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 370 x 775 mm (triptych)
c. 1820
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
23. Kabuki Theatre Scene with the Actors Ichimura Uzaemon XII, Nakamura Utaemon IV and Ichikawa Kuzô II
Utagawa Kunisada (Gototei Kunisada ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 370 x 760 mm (triptych)
c. 1840
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
24. Contemporary Representation of the Secret Visit of Tamakuzara to Genji (Tôsei Genji shinobu Tamakazura)
Utagawa Kunisada, also known as Toyokuni III (Toyokuni ga)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 363 x 750 mm (triptych)
1857
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
25. View of Shinobazu Pond from the Kiyomizu Temple in Ueno (Ueno Kiyomizu yori Shinobazu no chôbô)
Toyohara Chikanobu (Yôshû Chikanobu)
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 350 x 235 mm (triptych)
1894
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado
26. Sugoroku, 1 December 188?
Anonymous
Woodblock print, nishiki-e, 460 x 715 mm (6 sheets)
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Statue of David – Michelangelo (Accademia Gallery, Florence)

On Saturday 29th June, I visited the Accademia Gallery in Florence. Here I was able to see one of Michelangelo’s most famous pieces of work. That being the statue of david. This was originally unveiled in Florence in September 1504. It soon became a symbol of liberty and civic pride from the piece of Florence.

I found the following piece online,

His perfect beauty reminds me of Pico della Mirandola, who imagines God saying to man at the creation,
“Thou shalt have the power out of thy soul’s judgment to be reborn into the higher forms which are divine.”

(http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/Michelangelo-David.html)

This I can agree with. I wouldn’t dare say it was ‘just a marble statue’. It is perfect and had such beauty to it. The features were so intricate and the positioning of the statue created such an atmosphere around him. With the light shining down from the glass window, David stands proudly slightly raised and in the arch way, being the most important thing in the room. It really was divine.

During my time travelling, I saw so many pieces of work, all very different. From sculptures, to photography, to religious paintings and then more contemporary work. But this definitely stood out. When I entered the room and saw this magnificent piece of work at the bottom of the hall, I was overwhelmed. It truly is something amazing! Standing at 13 feet tall, you can’t miss it! His pose is so fluent and this really compliments how the sculpture was carved. David being a hero, is shown well as the statue is so big and the most important thing in the room, it gives a sense of superiority. You can see the emotion in David’s eyes, as this sculpture shows David as he is about to slay Goliath.

I find it incredible how this started off as just one large piece of marble. It was found in a Cathedral work area. Someone had previously tried to create something but gave up. It wasn’t till Michelangelo was commissioned to the piece of marble, that a masterpiece was created.

Advertisements

One thought on “Summer Work: Task 2

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s